Our Mission

To nourish the soul. To indulge the human spirit. To be the resource for distinctive, quality arts, entertainment and enrichment for all members of the Franklin community and surrounding areas.

Our Location and parking

316 Central Street, in historic City Hall
Franklin, NH 03235

Free parking is available on the street or behind the building, and in the large adjacent municipal lot.

Our History

In the 1890's the Franklin, NH town leaders focused their attention on quality of life issues for their vibrant, vital, successful community. By 1892 they had planned and started construction of a new town and Soldier's Memorial Hall. Designed by William Butterfield in the Romanesque Revival style, the red granite and brick building included Town offices, the police and water departments, the city court, a theatre and function hall.

It was soon affectionately referred to as "The Opera House." The term "Opera", in the late 1890's was commonly used to refer to many forms of musical and theatrical entertainment. Small "Opera" Houses like the Franklin Opera House, although not large enough to host a full-scale Opera Company, accommodated many smaller performances as well as individual Opera singers.

Immediately after its opening and for the next 50 years, the Franklin Opera House became a venue for balls, dances, lectures, plays, musicals, vaudeville shows, concerts, school productions and graduation ceremonies.

During the Depression, the Opera House provided social programs for the community and was a place for unemployed men to gather for games activities. In the basement, there was even a miniature golf course from 1930-1931. 

During World War II, programs of the Red Cross were offered there, as were other special, inventive programs. The auditorium was transformed into a basketball court for exhibition games, and utilized as a venue for wrestling.

After World War II, as the country began to tune into television and respond to commercial cinema, use of the Opera House declined. At the same time, the needs of city government grew. The police department expanded throughout the lower level, and district court offices were constructed on the stage. By 1970 administrative offices encroached into the auditorium until the balcony and stage were no longer visible to those attending meetings in what was to become City Council Chambers. The Franklin "Opera House," once an important and vital social center of the community, ceased to provide the entertainment for which it was designed. In 1999, however, with the vision of residents like Norma Schofield and Steve Foley, the City Hall began the transformation back into the Opera House once again. The drop ceiling was removed, the partitions which formed offices on stage were torn down, and myriad other aesthetic and technical improvements were made to enable the Opera House to be reborn. 

What started as the Franklin Opera House Restoration Committee evolved by 2000 to become a nonprofit corporation, Franklin Opera House, Inc. By 2001, the first shows in 30 years lit up the proscenium and breathed life into this grand old building.

While the Opera House operated successfully as a mostly volunteer-driven start-up nonprofit for several years, providing a wonderful venue for arts and other functions for the local community, the Board of Directors recognized that in order for it to grow and become a stable, mature, and thriving business, it needed to think beyond the Opera House serving the local community; sights were set on the Opera House becoming a regional destination, and a major attraction in central New Hampshire. 

Reflecting the broader geography it intended to serve, as well as aiming to infuse more brand recognition for the distinctive arts and entertainment it seeks to provide, in 2009 the name of the organization was changed to Middle New Hampshire Arts & Entertainment Center, or "The Middle" for short. 

After operating as "The Middle" for two years, it was determined that the cost of the staff needed to operate the increased number of shows and the effects of the economy on business in general forced the organization to reorganize and return to an all volunteer staff. The Franklin Community did not embrace the new Name of "The Middle" and membership in the organization had fallen significantly. 

In December of 2011, the members voted to rebrand and to return to the original brand name of Franklin Opera House. As we enter a new phase in our journey, we hope to build on the successes of the last few years and find new ways to preserve our wonderful "opera house" to promote Franklin and to enrich the community.

How You Can Help Us

Become a Member

Besides knowing you’re helping this historic institution carry out its mission, there are some membership perks.

All members have voting privileges at our annual meeting and celebration. 
In addition: 

$25 Associate Level
receives 1 voucher for Free Admission to an event produced by the Opera House.

$50 Family Level
receives 2 vouchers for Free Admission to an event produced by the Opera House.

$100 Supporting Level
receives 4 vouchers for Free Admission to an event produced by the Opera House.

$250 Sustaining Level
receives 6 vouchers for Free Admission to an event produced by the Opera House.

$500+ Star Level
receives Sustaining Level benefits plus 15% off tickets for all Opera House productions.
Consider Sponsorship

Corporate sponsors of Franklin Opera House enjoy a range of valuable benefits, including recognition on our website, in our program magazine, and at each show; VIP invitations to special events hosted by Franklin Opera House; complementary show tickets; and more. If you would like to explore the benefits of corporate sponsorship for your company, please contact us at director@franklinoperahouse.org , or by calling 934-1901.
We Thank Our Sponsors

NEW!

SUBSCRIBE to membership using our PayPal subscription service and your membership will automatically be renewed. Sustaining and Star members may also choose a monthly option!
Membership Options
Or download, print, and mail our paper membership form.